Weather-beaten

Untitled

I saw this old weather-beaten chair in the back garden of a house. There it stood with a dignity of its own and a desire to be used – almost invitational in wanting someone to sit in it. I’m always moved by the way certain inanimate objects can take on a life of their own.

The war artist Graham Sutherland once said this of rocks: “Certain conformations of rock seem to go beyond just being rock, they are emanations of some kind of personality.” Well, I think this chair goes beyond just being a chair, it’s an emanation of a personality.

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About Don

I love life. Sometimes it makes sense, other times not. Discerning its underlying patterns and beauty always provides great reward and meaning and is a passion I ineptly follow. I feel deeply attached to nature and love the sea with its distinct moods and colour and find walking along its beaches wonderfully inspiring. Writing, sketching and photography is a sheer joy for me and the blog is one of the places I am able to express these pursuits.
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30 Responses to Weather-beaten

  1. Its a great photo and I agree about the way inanimate objects can take on a life based on our thoughts around them.

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  2. Dave says:

    I love how even though it is black and white, you can see the green on the chair πŸ™‚

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  3. saymber says:

    The stories that chair could tell lol!

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  4. I like to imagine who might have sat in that chair and what they might have been watching…. πŸ™‚

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  5. nrhatch says:

    I’d love to see it refinished with a fresh coat of varnish. πŸ˜€

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  6. Hudson Howl says:

    ‘Emanation of personality’; for me, there is a certain tone of nostalgia to your words if put in context with the chair. Your chair makes me think of my ‘lonely blue shovel’. As well it makes me go further back. It reminds me of old musty photographs kept in old cardboard boxes retrieved from basements when a grandparent dies. It reminds me of my grandmother’s house long since bulldozed down.

    So many ways of looking at this chair. Has the chair been forgotten, is it of an era gone by. Perhaps just placed there as Objet d’art to become part of the landscape and in turn part of the aesthetic.

    Some things do deserved a coat varnish to preserved them, well others should be left alone to become part of the patina an die gracefully.

    To take Graham Sutherland’s quote further, traditional Inuit stone carvers never set out to carve a preconceived sculpture but instead looked and studied the stone till finally the stone gives up the story or shows what is living inside it.

    BTW (sorry am about to drift off topic), I’d never heard of Graham Sutherland so I thought, surely I would have remembered as I have the same last name. So I did the Google Dance. Interesting how so many War Artist went on with art afterwards in a completely different direction. Graham Sutherland’s fragmented tortured forms in his paintings I assume came from that wartime experience. Sculptor Henry Moore (a personal favourite) was another wartime artist who was molded by the horrors of war.

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    • Don says:

      Hudson, what can I say. You have soul, my friend. Your insights are just marvellous. So glad you gave an extension to Sutherland’s quote – brilliant. I saw a lot of his work in the National Gallery in London. Very inspiring. I’ll look up Henry Moore. Thanks again for your comment – appreciate it immensely.

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  7. ladyfi says:

    Ah yes – even inanimate objects can have a soul! Lovely shot.

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  8. darrelhoff says:

    These lyrics came to mind when i saw your title of your blog, by Creed:
    “Me..I’m rusted and weathered
    Barely holding together
    I’m covered with skin that peels and it just won’t heal”

    I guess i always think in lyrics πŸ™‚

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  9. ‘She’ looks like it is longing for the good old days – the enjoyment of lively conversations, children playing around her. There is something faithful about her look. What a lovely and interesting picture.

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  10. This is an awesome photograph, Don – the light and emotion it conveys is palpable and beautiful. What struck me was not just the chair but the setting – the slightly broken wall, the wild-looking plants, the scattering of leaves on the ground. It’s a wild and unkempt scene, but the chair gives it a homeliness.

    Perhaps this says more about me than about the photo, but I sense an invitation to embrace and become comfortable in the wildness of our world and our souls again.

    Thanks for sharing your beautiful perspective on our awesome world.

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    • Don says:

      John. it’s so good to hear from you. Knowing you, you have obviously looked at the image with the eye of your soul. What you draw out of that image is sheer beauty. To “become comfortable in the wildness of our world.” Just so beautiful and true. I just love the meaning that you have drawn from this image. Thank you for that and it inspires me to look at it even more carefully and closely. Thanks again and I hope you’re keeping well.

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  11. iamforchange says:

    I love your pages and your form of self expression, it is a pleasure to have you share your gifts through your pages Thank you. I have nominated you for blog of the Year please visit my page Blog of the year awards and nominations Thank you!
    Posted on December 9, 2012

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    • Don says:

      Thank you for your words which are a real gift of encouragement to me. Thank you also for your nomination – it is much appreciated and also inspires and uplifts me. But I’ve made the decision not to pursue any nominations. I hope you’ll not take offence to this, but I simply write what I feel and the issue of awards are really not part of who I am. I also hope that you will not see this as being self-righteous. It’s just simply who I am. Again, thank you for your encouragement and I sincerely hope that you will continue your visits. Let me also say how much I enjoy your blog and I thank you for that.

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  12. Terry says:

    Don, what a great picture – even without your blog pointing it out – it would have spoken – you are an exceptional ‘lay-photographer’. I love getting your blog – I might not comment regularly, but believe me I read it everytime. I wish there was a like button for comments too (hahhaaahhaa facebook has converted us into lazy noticers). I loved this one especially because I also often seen inaminate objects that seem to be shouting something! Thank you for putting it so succinctly,once again. T

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    • Don says:

      Always a pleasure Terry. Your interest in the blog is very affirming – thank you for that. Thank you also for your words on the photographs. Glad you enjoy them. If you want a like button just register with WordPress. You don’t have to open up a your own blog or do anything else, then you can simply click on the like button if you want, and it will register a like.

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  13. Katy says:

    I think the chair looks lonely. If there were two chairs, it would suggest companionship. I get the feeling this chairs next step will be the scrap heap positioned as it is out of way at the back of the garden. And yet it has so much life and potential left in it. Once again, your picture tells a story Don.

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    • Don says:

      Katy, I think your insight in to the chair’s potential is a great one. It does look rather lonely. Perhaps that’s why it seems to be longing for someone to sit in it. I promise you I’ll ask the owners to get a companion chair and place it alongside this one. Thanks Katy.

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  14. Summer says:

    Hallo Don : )

    I’ve a christmas card for you! : ) You can pick it up here http://summer4soul.wordpress.com/2012/12/11/1022/
    Have a nice day

    Sweet greetings, Summer

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  15. If only it could speak; what wonders it could tell….! πŸ˜‰

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