A Tall Ship Visit

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Last Sunday our harbour in Durban was visited by three Tall Ships from the Netherlands. Quite an event. So Jane and I took a harbour trip to see them. It wasn’t easy photographing from a bopping boat, but I got this one of the “Europa” one of the Tall Ships. I find them so impressive.

And then passing a part of the harbour, I couldn’t resist this shot of the cranes. I loved the lines and the colours.

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About Don

I love life. Sometimes it makes sense, other times not. Discerning its underlying patterns and beauty always provides great reward and meaning and is a passion I ineptly follow. I feel deeply attached to nature and love the sea with its distinct moods and colour and find walking along its beaches wonderfully inspiring. Writing, sketching and photography is a sheer joy for me and the blog is one of the places I am able to express these pursuits.
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22 Responses to A Tall Ship Visit

  1. Theo Coggin says:

    Magnificent shots Don! That must have been a moving experience. On our recent cruise I found it an incredibly emotional experience to pass by other ships and join in the greeting by foghorn, as I tried to capture in a recent Facebook posting.

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    • Don says:

      Thanks Theo, it was. Ships touch something deep in me, not sure what. I can relate to your experience of passing other ships. I think it stirs up some kind of archetype in us.

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  2. Beautiful, Don! Tall ships seem to have a majesty and magic that endures. I don’t think the current super cruise ships will ever carry the same sense of romance.

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    • Don says:

      You’re so right Linda. That’s precisely it. There is a majesty and a magic about tall ships that just cannot be lost. The cruise ships look big, almost clumsy with strange kind of proportions. Long live tall ships. Thanks Linda.

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  3. Tall ships are so beautiful and majestic. We love it when they come into Falmouth Bay. The cranes are very splendid too! 🙂

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    • Don says:

      I saw my first one in England and never fail to see them whenever I visit. I’m always fascinated by their sails and the combination of both their strength and vulnerability. No better sight than one cutting through the water in full sail. You’re so lucky to have them coming like that in to Falmouth Bay.

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  4. Hudson Howl says:

    I fancy tall ships as well. Good f’ur you Don for getting out to see them. There has been two major Tall Ship events (60 plus vessels) in the pass thirty years in Atlantic Canada both I was lucky to see. The first one I was living in Halifax at that time, the second I just happened to be in Nova Scotia.

    The ocean and those whom followed the winds on the surface and those currents unseen below, have long been a romantic notion that still draws a good many of us. It is fitting that tall ships still visit ports in Africa. After all, it was the ancient sailors whom mastered the currents, not the winds as one might expect, which allowed them to go back an forth between the North Atlantic and the South Atlantic. It was that knowledge which eventually led to further exploration and the discovery of the other side of the pond.

    Not sure if you have ever seen Canada’s sailing icon the Grand Banks schooner ‘Bluenose II’. Here is her link, she is worthy of a looksy http://bluenose.novascotia.ca/

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    • Don says:

      What a sight those events must have been Hudson. AAAH! what those names, Halifax and Nova Scotia do to me. Distant places and full of romance. I suppose that sounds crazy to you. You put your finger on something of it when you speak of the winds on the surface and the unseen currents below – beautiful.

      Clicked your link. Thank you. What a magnificent ship and what an adventure it must be to be part of her crew. Just love it!

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  5. Hudson Howl says:

    Have you ever read the Atlantic by Simon Winchester. Worth a read. i remember when you flew to England and as read your post I thought if this book. Man no longer sees the Atlantic or oceans in general like man of sail did. We no longer fear it as man simply flys over it in hours instead of taking months even years to get somewhere on it under sail without electronics or navigational aids. As a result the oceans and that which lives in it has been marginalized. Only man can do that to something as vast and wild as an ocean. Am afraid it will come to bite us in the extrémité arrière if it has not already.

    But for a really good read, and my all time favourite book of fiction (am showing my Canadian bias, perhaps) is one written in 1928 by Frank Parker Day entitled ROCKBOUND.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockbound

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  6. nrhatch says:

    Great shots of majestic ships. Thanks for sharing, Don.

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  7. ladyfi says:

    Tall ships are a floating bit of history. And those cranes remind me of sea giraffes. Lovely set of shots.

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  8. katy says:

    Those tall ships look as if they belong on the high seas, whereas the liners, breathtaking as they may be. e.g. The Titanic, look as if they have been placed there by mans hand. Both impressive in their own way, but the tall ships tug at the heartstrings don,t they.

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  9. Stunning. How exciting that they came to visit and a great photo you got there.

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  10. josna says:

    I agree with Fiona. Your photo of the tall ship, elegantly afloat and a masterpiece of construction, really transports one back to a past when sail was the sole means of world travel. I’ve been reading Amitav Ghosh’s Ibis Trilogy, set in the early 19th century, much of which takes place on and around such ships. This photo helps bring them to life, danger, daring, world domination (!), and adventure.

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    • Don says:

      Hard to grasp that there was a time when sail and wind powered ships. So glad the photo brought the book to life. The Trilogy sounds interesting, Josna. I’ve never heard of the author and that’s probably just ignorance.

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      • josna says:

        Yes. I mentioned Amitav Ghosh, Don, not only because he’s one of my favorite novelists and the trilogy (of which only two vols. have been published so far) involves a lot of traveling in ships such as these, but also because part of the story involves a ship that was once a slave ship, then used to transport indentured laborers to Mauritius, and still later, used to smuggled opium to China. Ghosh is also a historian and does a tremendous amount of research for his novels. You really get transported into his world as you read.

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      • Don says:

        Sounds good, Josna. Need to look in to it.

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