From My Sketchbook 13

IMG_1511.1

A landscape I did in oils of a scene in the Umphumalanga area of our country. I’m always touched by the Acacia trees that dot the African landscape. To me they look sprightly and so fully alive. They also have a kind of feminine look about them.

Advertisements

About Don

My name is Don Scrooby and I live in the United Kingdom. I have a deep love for nature and open spaces and one of my great loves in life is sketching, particularly in pen and water colour and occasionally in pencil. Iโ€™m quite new at the art and I sketch mainly from photographs Iโ€™ve taken, but also enjoy outdoor sketching. My sketchbooks, although no great shakes, are important to me and I decided to create my blog in order to share some of their contents with those who may be interested.
Image | This entry was posted in Art, Beauty, From My Sketchbook, Nature, Poetic Imagination and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

44 Responses to From My Sketchbook 13

  1. Wow, Don! So beautiful…you are very talented. There is definitely a femininity to the Acacia tree, I agree.

    Like

  2. Theo Coggin says:

    Truly lovely Don

    Like

  3. Ese' s Voice says:

    Beautiful, Don! So…live!

    Like

  4. Healthy A-Z says:

    Beautiful! So vivid and fully life!

    Like

  5. Kathy Marsden says:

    I gasp when I see what you are producing, Don. Very lovely! How wonderful to have discovered your gift. Can you share a bit of what it has added to your life?

    Like

    • Don says:

      Landscape has always fascinated me, Kathy. In fact I am of the firm belief that we are all profoundly shaped by the landscape in to which we are born and live. I feel there is a deep connection between the inner landscape of soul, and here I mean all living things, and the outer landscape in which they unfold and grow. And so I just try and express that inner and outer connection through the hesitant and stumbling art I produce. I believe very strongly in a spirituality of landscape. I’m especially attracted to wide open spaces and that’s part of why Namibia has had such a powerful influence over me. Even as a young child I remember going off and quietly just experiencing my surroundings. Because of all this I have also found great comfort and meaning in the poetry of William Wordsworth and many of the other great English nature poets. Thanks for asking.

      Like

      • Kathy Marsden says:

        Thank you, Don. It’s so personal, isn’t it. I feel the spirituality through the connecting of inner and outer ‘landscapes’, and I’m only now being able to value those memories of childhood awareness you speak of. It’s quite a discovery! In my sketching which is in pencil and recently using coloured pencils, I was taught to work with shadows. This has connected me to my shadows in a profound way. I’m more and more aware of the importance of shadow in that it gives perspective and form. Without it things don’t have life. This is changing the way I look at things on the outside of me – the context of my life. I read recently that Carl Jung said that the shadow is 90% gold. Wonderful, wonderful thought!

        Like

      • Don says:

        Really enjoyed what you have said Kathy – thank you. Sadly, the religious perspective has not been very friendly and knowledgeable as far as the shadow has been concerned. In fact it has too often been downright destructive. I’ve found this to be rather disturbing. Thanks again.

        Like

  6. Hudson Howl says:

    First reaction evoked a deep, low, irrepressible, GRUNT!!! -out of me, Don.

    Ethereal beauty, a majestic monarch, the kind that reins supreme over her submissive, willing subjects.

    I could say more, though it kinda goes pornographic from this point onward, definitely bending to ‘hot and bothered’.

    Like

    • Don says:

      You have such a gift with words, Hudson – thank you for your beautiful description. I think I know something of what you mean. There is a profound sexuality in landscape. Sometimes people think one a little mad when you speak of it. But as I said to Kathy, the great nature poets have taught me that. That sexuality is there, and to experience it in your perceptions of landscape definitely draws you deeper in to it.

      Like

  7. Mary says:

    This is a beautiful landscape – fabulous countryside and distant view.

    Like

    • Don says:

      Thank you Mary. It is a beautiful part of the land. You may have heard of the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Well, this is the province in which it is situated – a magnificent expanse of land teeming with all sorts of wild animals.

      Like

  8. gwynnem says:

    I’m duly impressed, Dan. This is a great oil painting/sketch.

    Like

  9. sefeniak says:

    Very nice! Glad to see you are able to post again!

    Like

  10. Awesome work, Don! I love it!

    Like

  11. Beautiful painting, Don. Nature is a part of us as we are a part of Nature.

    Like

  12. ladyfi says:

    Wow — this is superb!

    Like

  13. josna says:

    Luminous! What a beautiful painting, Don. And in oils, too.

    Like

  14. Shweta says:

    Beautiful painting Don

    Like

  15. nrhatch says:

    That’s a gorgeous landscape . . . and skyscape. That Acacia tree is lovely, like lace.

    And THANKS for your comment on SLTW this morning. Here’s to embracing the Mystery. ๐Ÿ˜€

    Like

    • nrhatch says:

      These “sketches” of yours are getting more and more polished and professional.

      You’ve got talent.

      Like

    • Don says:

      I must say, Nancy, that the older I get I find myself being far more comfortable with “not knowing” than with “knowing.” In fact certainties are often obstacles to perception and growth. That image of the earth does the opposite to me. It doesn’t create a sense of meaninglessness, but rather one of awe and inspiration because of the whole mystery of it all. It was a great post thank you. And thank you for your affirmation.

      Like

      • nrhatch says:

        I’m with you. I didn’t find Sagan’s comments depressing.

        But, for someone who’s been led to believe that humans have dominion over “all creation,” it must be disheartening to see that we’re not really “head custodian” of “everything.”

        Instead, we’re “in charge” of a tiny speck of dust. It must feel like a demotion. ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Like

      • Don says:

        Strange how the illusion of being in charge persists. It’s purely ego.

        Like

      • nrhatch says:

        Yes! It’s why garbage men became “Sanitation Engineers.” ๐Ÿ˜†

        Like

  16. Absolutely gorgeous!! One of my favourites so far. It definitely brings me right there. Spectacular. Thanks for sharing!
    Gina

    Like

  17. This landscape is just beautiful! I enjoyed finding your blog and reading some of your posts. I look forward to reading more from you and seeing your lovely art. ~Rita

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s