Light And Dark Holding Hands

DBG 6.1-14 (2)

After taking this image I found myself again wondering why we’re always encouraged to liberate ourselves from the darkness? I know it has a metaphorical meaning, but it also has the effect of always turning darkness in to an enemy.

We are conceived in the dark; our bodies rest and replenish themselves in the dark; shadow gives form and any artist will tell you that the drama happens in the dark. I just cannot think dualistically when it comes to light and dark, or anything else for that matter.

Something I love doing in the evenings is to sit quietly on our veranda and to gaze out at the twinkling lights of our village. It’s in moments like these that I experience the dark holding hands with the light. It gives me great peace.

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About Don

I love life. Sometimes it makes sense, other times not. Discerning its underlying patterns and beauty always provides great reward and meaning and is a passion I ineptly follow. I feel deeply attached to nature and love the sea with its distinct moods and colour and find walking along its beaches wonderfully inspiring. Writing, sketching and photography is a sheer joy for me and the blog is one of the places I am able to express these pursuits.
This entry was posted in Art, Beauty, Nature, Photography, Poetic Imagination, Spirituality, wisdom and insight and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to Light And Dark Holding Hands

  1. Wonderful post. I am also in love with the dark.

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  2. Beautiful, Don. The dark complements the light and makes us more aware of it. It relieves the glare, allows rest, and has its own intrinsic beauty. As you say, it “holds hands” with the light
    The dark is not an enemy, it is a friend.

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    • Don says:

      “It relieves the glare.” I like those words of yours, Linda. Maybe that’s why we find candlelight so attractive – it’s a combination of the two.

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  3. josna says:

    What a beautiful visual and mental image. As the light “holds hands” with the dark, so your pictures hold hand with your words. If more people were unable to think dualistically, and just to sit quietly in the dark, we would have more peace in this world. Thank you, Don.

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    • Don says:

      You make such a good point Josna. Dualistic thinking is fragmentary and holds within it the essence of fragmentation and violence. Thank you.

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  4. We took Teresa’s 80 year old father back to the house where he was born this week. It’s in a remote area of Appalachia in North Carolina in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The mountains are covered with woods in the “holler” where he was raised. We remarked about how dark it must be at night, and he had this to say: “Night doesn’t just descend on you here. It grabs you.”

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    • Don says:

      What a wonderful description, Sheila. He sounds as if he is a man who lives close to nature. It must have been a moving experience for him, a time of intense memory.

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  5. Michael says:

    Darkness seems to me to be a vast Potentiality, the wholly abstract container in which specificity may be rendered and made visible by the light the darkness contains. Dark and light are truly a unity. I sometimes reflect on the fact that the greatest darkness we know- the vastness of space- is flooded with starlight from all directions. We don’t realize the darkness is flooded with light until a solid object appears within the space to reflect the light. Creation is a means of reflecting a light that was previously invisibly hidden within…

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    • Don says:

      So enjoyed your comment. Full of marvellous insight. I love the way you speak of darkness being a vast potentiality made visible by light. It just speaks so magnificently of the union of the two. I also like the way you speak of space being flooded with starlight. Thank you for a great comment, Michael.

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  6. Lovely, Don. Without the darkness how could we possibly appreciate the light for what it is?
    The darkness holds many mysteries. Like the new theme look as well.

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    • Don says:

      Thanks Melissa. Darkness certainly holds mystery in itself. I think that’s part of its attraction. Thank you for liking the theme. I felt I needed to explode a little. The other one was a bit small and tight, especially for images.

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  7. nrhatch says:

    Lovely write, Don. I enjoy a still dark evening with flickers of light from stars.

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  8. Next to darkness, my favorite companion is silence. Seems few appreciate either. In my dusty old (former) Spanish horse village, they go hand in hand with no street lights, unpaved roads and the vastness of the desert.

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  9. Pingback: when did home become a four-letter word (part III) | Missing Zero

  10. ladyfi says:

    So true! And without the darkness, we wouldn’t enjoy the light so much and would miss all the beautiful stars.

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  11. Don, your words about darkness have me pondering my own tendency to give it a bad rap. I think, for me, it is darkness without hope of any light that I fear. I love to sleep in total darkness; however, in the morning I love pulling up the blind and having the light stream across the bed. I am so glad that our large trees block much of the streetlights. I miss the darkness of a country road.

    Blessings ~ Wendy

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    • Don says:

      I love the way your comment is filled with the paradox of light and dark. That’s precisely it – the paradoxical nature of both. Thanks Wendy and your images were fantastic.

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