“It’s Boring”

491px-Van_Gogh_Sunflowers_Neue_Pinakothek_8672Have you ever noticed how people can look at things, and then suddenly without any real thought, describe them as boring? Life for them has to be upbeat, constantly changing and always providing an atmosphere for the latest fad to flourish and die.

I wonder if this has anything to do with our shallowness of sight?  Can the same thing be seen differently every time? I believe it can.  Van Gogh painted sun flowers until they came out of his ears, yet every one different in a myriad of ways.  Lady Fi is a blog I love following. She takes photos of a beautiful lake with a jetty strutting out in to the water, often with her dog Oscar in the scene. I’ve seen this lake from every angle, in every season, in every kind of light and weather and it never ceases to amaze me.  There’s always something new about it. The beauty of the scenes are embedded in me and I can’t wait for the next portrayal – an incredible example of seeing the same thing, but always differently, each image displaying a unique beauty of its own.

It seems to me that once we think we know something, we actually stop seeing it. Shallowness of sight and boredom will always embrace and feed each other.

Advertisements

About Don

I love life. Sometimes it makes sense, other times not. Discerning its underlying patterns and beauty always provides great reward and meaning and is a passion I ineptly follow. I feel deeply attached to nature and love the sea with its distinct moods and colour and find walking along its beaches wonderfully inspiring. Writing, sketching and photography is a sheer joy for me and the blog is one of the places I am able to express these pursuits.
This entry was posted in Art, Beauty, Contemplation, imagination, inspiration, Life, Poetic Imagination, wisdom and insight and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

39 Responses to “It’s Boring”

  1. Good post again Don.
    I see the same things over and over again and I am constantly amazed at them. Even the noise of the cicadas that beats into everyone’s brains in the first half of summer changes constantly. It is never boring. The birds and trees outside my window are always there, but they are never boring.
    I feel sorry for those who find life boring at any time. Even when “there is nothing to do” there is always peaceful contemplation.
    Life, things, beauty, boring? never!

    Like

  2. nrhatch says:

    I agree . . .

    Refraining from snap judgments about people, places, and things makes sense given our limited vantage point. We should keep our eyes and ears open and mindfully observe life with alert curiosity rather than a rush to judgment.

    But . . .

    As we observe the world around us ~ seeing people, places, and things with alert curiosity ~ we are going to see patterns which enable us to conclude, suppose, or conjecture about what we’ve observed. Based on our observations and experiences, we may be drawn to some people, places, and things, while being bored or repelled by others.

    And . . .

    Maybe that is as it should be.

    If we are to honor OUR own life purpose, we have to allow ourselves to be the arbiter of what we are drawn to and what holds little or no interest or appeal. After all, there is not enough time for all of us to do it all. We have to pick and choose those pursuits and interests that work for us.

    Sometimes recognizing that something is “boring” is OK ~ BFF loves flipping through car magazines. I find them BORING. I would rather watch paint dry. That’s a clear signal that cars have NOTHING to do with my life purpose.

    The key to sifting through our options and possibilities is to do it all MINDFULLY and with alert curiosity ~> a conscious effort to sift through what is “extraneous” to us so that we can unearth the “essential”

    Like

    • Don says:

      Well said Nancy. Appreciate your insightful comment. I too agree with you. As you say, the key is, and I so like what you say – “Mindful, alert curiosity.” That’s the essence of it all.

      Like

  3. Don,
    I was so happy to read your post today – for some reason I haven’t been getting any emails when you post and I’ve missed you!! I never find you boring!!

    Like

  4. ptero9 says:

    Great insights Don! You made me laugh because I have a little pet peeve about people who say they’re bored! Life is too short!!!

    “It seems to me that once we think we know something, we actually stop seeing it.”

    Yes. I sense that people see the world as dead. You hear people sometimes say, “That’s only a dumb rock.”

    For myself, there seems to never be enough time to take it all in, no matter where I am and who I am with.
    xxx
    Debra

    Like

    • Don says:

      Debra, you’re so right. I think that seeing the world as dead is a sad result of the functional and mechanistic mind. “That’s only a dumb rock” is a perfect example of this. I wonder just how much boredom comes out of simply seeing the world around us like that. life is too short – thanks Debra.

      Like

  5. Very interesting, Don. It is rather irksome to hear someone declare that something is boring, I agree. Occasionally I catch my children blurt out these words only to get a sideways look from me. In an attempt to make them think before categorizing, I often will follow up by asking them why they think it is boring. Usually it is that it doesn’t relate to things they already deem interesting, as you so nicely put.

    Colours, textures, ideas, change; we all tend to gravitate toward certain things using a fallback cliche that something is “boring” if it doesn’t jive with our comfort zone. When we become open to really seeing things for what they are the notion of boredom vanishes into thin air.

    Great post, Don.

    Like

    • Don says:

      I like what you say Melissa. The problem I have too is that the word boredom is often used as a kind of judgemental term. Because someone is bored with it, it often means there’s something wrong with you because you don’t find it boring. Appreciate your comment.

      Like

  6. sefeniak says:

    Don, Thanks for making me think. You have that knack! I have never liked the word “boring” in any context. Life is never boring. Not in my world anyway. There is something really wrong if it is.

    Like

  7. Oh so true, Don. I observe with heightened awareness. And whether I am intently focused or casually observing, I endeavor to be comfortably cognizant. And guess what, amazing ‘things’ show up.

    Like

    • Don says:

      Thanks Eric. You have a wonderful way with words – “I endeavour to be comfortably cognizant” – marvellous. And I agree, amazing things do show up while practising that.

      Like

  8. theINFP says:

    Your post is so insightful Don. In this tech filled world I have found myself returning to simplicity and stimulation of the sense through nature, people and animals, I no doubt boring to some 🙂

    Like

  9. Well, actually, Van Gogh painted sunflowers until they came out of one ear (since he cut the other one off…sorry, Don, but I couldn’t resist). 🙂
    I think that all the technological games and gadgets have fogged our eyes and minds to expect fast-paced entertainment, and with everything else we are bored. What a loss, and hardening of the creative spirit.
    I read an article about a retired professor who returned to teach a class for a middle school teacher who was ill. He arranged a field trip to his university campus for a weekend, and the students couldn’t even have cell phones. They spent their time in a fine library and an outstanding art museum, and their responses were handwritten on tablet paper instead of written and spell-checked, etc. on computers. This was wasted on the group who was in withdrawal, but at least it was a start for them, and some of the others felt it was life changing.

    Like

    • Don says:

      Marylin – you got me. I nearly packed up laughing. I’m sure Vincent will forgive us, but thanks for the reminder.

      A wonderful story about that professor. I’m so glad that at least there were some who found it life changing. You mention a hardening of the creative spirit, I think that’s very real when we stop seeing more deeply in to things. Great comment – thank you.

      Like

  10. Really Nice Blog…I don’t find that I read a lot of blogs…mostly because I am working on my writing…not that I don’t care…about other’s blogs…I DO! I just found yours, very simple-to the point and a nice read…I like other blogs…but merely tend to write vs. read…my Mother is always puzzled by this…why I don’t read anymore..??? Well, I would rather write..I really enjoyed your read though….and will look for it for sure…nice…I thouroughly enjoyed it, very thought provoking and it stemmed nicely…flow..! Nicely put! So true..one that makes you think…which is why we as writers write…good going!

    Like

  11. mariyaah says:

    Whatever you said Don is absolutely right at it’s own place.
    But you know being a medical student with bundles of books, lectures, notebooks, practicals etc etc .. It’s just enough to give you a monotonic feeling.

    Like

  12. Anonymous says:

    Good post Don. All the above comments have said everything so eloquently so nothing more to add.

    Like

  13. ladyfi says:

    Gosh – thank you so much for the kind kind words.

    Your post is so insightful. I think the younger generations are so used to having things happen all the time. It’s up to us to give our kids the gift of seeing the small things, of using their imaginations!

    Like

  14. Healthy A-Z says:

    I love how you always make me think about things. I now realize I don’t even need to “see” anything, my mind has often re-imagined the world around me adding many new possibilities in wonderous ways.

    Like

  15. Hudson Howl says:

    Crawls out of self-imposed exile to comment.

    The world happens despite us. It surrounds each us; it’s beauty and splendor is always present in a zillion different ways. Some walk into it, like a Van Gogh or Lady Fi (the latter I hold with fond regard), where others walk away from it. Boredom I suppose is symptom, in part, of a common affliction of seeing the world via a tiny digital screen – an increasing inability to see with our senses, emotions and intellect. Thankfully we have creative souls around us, though not as many as we once did. Less prophets and naysayers , more purveyors of shadowy light would do us good. Does one really need a I-pad Air or Microsoft Surface to be creative and see the world and to be expressive?

    Like

    • Don says:

      Hudson, you had me worried friend. I was wondering where you were. Good to have you back. Hope the self-imposed exile gave you gifts you can share. Certainly looks that way when I read your comment. Love what you say. “There is Beauty in the World” – Your song, remember, on one of your posts.

      Like

      • Hudson Howl says:

        No worries, I don’t get lost, though I do at times get misplaced -more frequently of late, though not of my own doing.

        Am impressed you remembered Macy Gray’s ‘There is Beauty in the World’, nice to know am not just a bad influence on you. It is interesting to note, the first and official video for that song by the American soul singer was shot at the Towers of Sobato Rodia in the Watts area in the city of Loss Angels. The location for the video I thought was an apt one. The story behind the towers and how they came to be is an interesting one; the creative spirit rises in mysterious places. I’ve had a long time appreciation for the Towers, as a art history teacher I had grew up only a block away. He re-accounted watching Sam build them, even attributed shards of pots and glass which adorn the towers.

        Hope all is well with you. I have been reading along, I have gotten over my jealousy of you wandering around England though it was difficult. Here it’s flip’n cold, not fit for man or beast as Elvira will attest to.

        Like

      • Don says:

        Quite something that, Hudson. Yes I’m well and back from England. We arrived out of temperatures below zero in to blistering tropical heat. Envy you your cold. Send some it our way, we desperately need it. Give Elvira a squeeze for me. How about some shots of her again. Keep well.

        Like

  16. Another great post Don! ‘Shallowness of sight’ embracing and feeding boredom – incredible phrasing there. Your wise words about the lake, everything here, reminds me how happy I am that I raised my children in a home where the word was essentially ‘banned’. I simply have never believed in boredom. Kids who utter ‘I’m bored’ soon find themselves scrubbing floors as an option to riding their bike, drawing a picture, reading a book, or playing with toys. There is far too much to see, learn and do in life to ever utter any word like ‘boring’.

    Like

    • Don says:

      Thanks Gina. “There is far too much to see, learn and do in life to ever utter any word like ‘boring’.” No truer word. I remember as a kid how creative we were in making up games. There was no, as you say, no place for boredom.

      Like

  17. Pingback: Unearthing The Essential | Spirit Lights The Way

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s