Spoiling a Good Walk

golf-656340_640I’ve been watching the Masters and saw Jordan Spieth’s magnificent record-breaking win at Augusta. Quite incredible. What a win!

Now this may sound a little off-beat, but being a walker, not a golfer, I’m often attracted to the actual walking in golf itself, especially those moments when the golfers purposefully stride out with their caddies behind them struggling to keep up. There’s a kind of magic in those steps. When I see them it’s as if a wand is waved over me and I just want to get up and walk. But what spoils it for me is the way these walks are marred by the stress and the tension and the competitiveness of the game.

So, whenever I watch and enjoy a game of golf, I can’t help but sit there and hear the subliminal voice of Mark Twain, “Golf is a good walk spoiled. ” Β πŸ™‚

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About Don

I love life. Sometimes it makes sense, other times not. Discerning its underlying patterns and beauty always provides great reward and meaning and is a passion I ineptly follow. I feel deeply attached to nature and love the sea with its distinct moods and colour and find walking along its beaches wonderfully inspiring. Writing, sketching and photography is a sheer joy for me and the blog is one of the places I am able to express these pursuits.
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36 Responses to Spoiling a Good Walk

  1. Loved the humor in this. I often think that about my photography. I was having such a good hike, bu then there all of these photo stops. Of late I’ve been trying to imagine going without my camera. Eek!

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  2. nrhatch says:

    I’m with you, Don. We watched the tail end of the masters and enjoyed seeing Jordan Spieth setting all those records. The only part of golf that appeals to me is the walk and the putting. The driving, not so much.

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  3. Mary says:

    Oh so funny and true. I love watching golf on TV, Jordan grew up in these parts and the DFW area is quite excited about his success ~

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  4. I’m not particularly a fan of golf but I love walking Don. And I love the Twain quote and it seems to resonate with you as well. πŸ˜‰
    Diana xo

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  5. davecenker says:

    I used to play golf – a lot. And one of the things that I enjoyed about it most was the solitary time it permitted me. I wasn’t being anti-social, but I much preferred to play nine holes alone after work rather than carrying on a conversation with playing partners. The other thing I enjoyed – as you might expect – is slinging the bag over my shoulder and walking. It was such a therapeutic experience mentally, and you received physical exercise too πŸ˜‰ So, in my case, the good walk wasn’t spoiled, but I can certainly see where it could be so in many situations. Thanks for sharing Don and best wishes for an inspired day!

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  6. Bill says:

    Ok Don, Time to hear from a golfer. Yes the walk (and I don’t use a caddy other than myself) is absolutely great. To walk the beauty of the fairway, the bunkers, the manicured greens is hard to explain unless you do it. Watching on TV is great but does not compare to walking it personally. To follow that ball while in flight knowing that you just hit it where you wanted is personally rewarding. Or to hear it as it drops in the cup on the green is like finishing a race or solving one of life’s problems. To find it lying next to a tree or under a bush and finding a way to advance it, is how we deal with life when we have an issue to deal with and find a way to move forward. The tension in golf can bring you down and spoil your round just like the tensions of life and take you off course. When one learns to handle the emotions on that golf course we can also learn how to handle our emotions in life. I can live without golf, but my life would be a mess if I couldn’t deal with the emotions it brings. Ok, I know a little deep. But many people that excel in this life whether in a sport, in business, in marriage, in life are people who learn how to handle what life has offered up. Your post was a great mind stimulation this morning. Thanks! May your day be bright and your accomplishments rewarding. Almost forgot – I can only wish I was as good as Jordan Spieth. To handle the emotions of the Masters at the age of 21 should be an inspiration to all of us! To be as good as him with the emotions of life would even be better!

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    • Don says:

      Enjoyed your passion here Bill. Golf obviously plays a real role in your life and I think that’s marvellous. I love the way you relate it to life. It seems to be a kind of parable of life. Yes, I also thought about Jordan Spieth’s maturity in handling that kind of pressure. Must be quite a person. Really appreciate your comment Bill, and thanks for enlightening us with the golfer’s perspective. πŸ™‚

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  7. ladyfi says:

    I’d rather walk than play golf any day… πŸ˜‰

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  8. I’m with you there, Don. Golf courses always look so invitingly beautiful as places to walk but just a bit hazardous ! I really liked what Bill said, gave me food for thought too. Walking itself is a mind untangler and problem solver, we find.
    All the best πŸ™‚

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    • Don says:

      I agree Sally it is a mind untangler and problem solver. I also find it generates creativity. Not sure what I would do without walking. I often think of the difficulty you have and how that relates to your love for walking – can’t be easy.

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  9. You know, Don, as you began I was thinking of Twain’s comment about golf! I’m not a huge golfing fan, to watch or to play, yet everyone else in my family loves golf. We went to a tournament in Arizona once, and my favorite part was watching the caddies walk the course and study slopes the day before the tournament began. I hadn’t realized they did that.
    I spoke to one back at the club house; he was in his 50s and been a professional caddy for years. For him, the pre-walk was a calm treat, and on the greens of some of the back holes he took off his shoes and socks and “felt” the grass between his toes, though he said he could only do that as the sun was going down and if he wasn’t part of a group.

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    • Don says:

      Yes, I’ve heard of those pre – walks too Marylin. It’s quite fascinating what they take in and the notes they make. Love the part of him taking off his shoes and socks. Imagine doing that in the middle of a game. πŸ™‚

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  10. My Dad, an avid golfer would totally agree with Mark Twain. So often he would arrive home, upset about his Golf score! obviously forgetting about the lovely walk and fitness he was experiencing as well! Great post Don. πŸ™‚

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  11. calvin says:

    Am part Scottish, though not the part that likes golf. I understand completely, the extreme would be hockey which I doubt you’ve watch much of. As a kid, we thought, strap on some blades and wings would appear. We could fly, soar, flip and spin But in the game, when the wings get clipped, the competitiveness takes precedent, the gloves are dropped in favour of a brawl. An for that reason am not a hockey fan -am surprised they give me a passport stating my citizenship.

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    • Don says:

      Calvin, you fall under the category of oddball and it’s the oddballs that ultimately make the world go around and they’re pretty intriguing and fascinating people. πŸ™‚

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      • calvin says:

        Your too kind. Though, to re-arrange an old southern phrase, it’s as easy as falling off a greasy log backwards.

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  12. I must agree with you & Mark Twain, Don! πŸ™‚ I have never seen the point of golf.

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  13. Val Boyko says:

    Coming from Scotland and an avid golfing family – my dad was a British Amateur Champion – I see both sides clearly. Bill sounds like my brother, however I am more like Lady Fi 😊
    Its okay to be different.
    Just don’t tell the folks back in Scotland πŸ˜‰

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  14. Hariod Brawn says:

    Then again Don, just walking is something very few can do. What I mean is, that just as when the Zen teachers’ say ‘just sit’, there are very few who can actually do this, instead indulging internalised chatter and so on. ‘Just walking’, if we can do it, is a quite delicious experience I think.

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  15. Don, I also loved watching that young Hook ’em Horns Texans win the Masters this year, and I will tell you I live a little more than an hour from Augusta National so I have actually had the privilege of walking in the gallery several times around that magnificent course in the spring. It is truly a breathtaking walk. As a former golfer in my youth, I can also say I much prefer the walk without the sticks and the annoyance of chasing the little white ball from bunker to water to tall grass to woods before putting it past the hole on the green. Fore!! πŸ™‚

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    • Don says:

      That’s quite amazing Sheila. What a privilege.Must be marvellous doing that walk. I can just imagine the sense of history. So glad your walks are now trouble free. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

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